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Hollywood Stills

March 27 @ 5:00 pm - August 15 @ 4:00 pm

Photographs from The Butler Institute of American Art

Please Note: This exhibition is now on-view in person at our 600 N. Woodland Blvd. galleries. However, we’ll continue to offer weekly virtual viewing selections below for those who would like to maintain social distance. You can read about the on-site safety precautions we are taking at each of our locations here.

ABOUT THIS EXHIBITION

From the very inception of the motion picture industry, still images have accompanied the release and marketing of feature films, drawing-in customers to the local “movie houses” with their evocative images and studies of the stars. From the late silent film era to more modern times, artful and dramatically composed photographs were used to capture the essence of the features they highlighted. Displayed in glass cases outside the theaters, these pictures were sometimes used in local print advertising, as well as accompanying spicy stories in magazines like Photoplay and Modern Screen.

Many of the artists were the movies’ own camera operators and crew members, excellent still photographers who augmented their roles as on-set documentarians. Not only were specific moments from the actual films captured, but also “behind the scenes” images of the cast, crew, and set.

This fascinating exhibition contains 200 of the best examples of these cinematic advertising images. Although these photographs were specifically created for promotional purposes, they display a fine art sensibility, demonstrating expert technical knowledge and often a keen sense of drama and composition. Many of the photographs in this collection were produced anonymously, but others represent the work of more eminent Hollywood photographers such as Edward Steichen, George Hurrell, and Robert Coburn.

Some of Hollywood’s most memorable movies are encapsulated in the dramatic impressions these photographs convey. The stunning exhibition is made possible by the Butler Institute of American Art, through a generous gift from the private collection of Mr. and Mrs. George Kelley.

Exhibition Details:

Hollywood Stills: Photographs from the Butler Institute of American Art

On view March 27 – Summer 2020

600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand, Florida 32720

 

Top Image: Hollywood Cavalcade, Photograph, Alice Faye, Stuart Erwin, and Don Ameche

Hollywood Stills – Virtual Gallery
Hollywood Stills – Virtual Gallery
Gypsy Rose Lee
Gypsy Rose Lee
Gypsy Rose Lee (1911-1970) made her vaudeville debut at age four. As an adult, she switched to burlesque and was the best-known stripper of the 1930s. She made about a dozen films as well as some television. She wrote two mystery novels and an autobiography that became a Broadway musical and a 1962 film starring Natalie Wood. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Pola Negri
Pola Negri
The Spanish Dancer (1923), Famous Players-Lasky, Directed by Herbert Brenon. Pola Negri (1897-1987) was a popular star in the silent era. She came to Hollywood after making films in Germany with Ernst Lubitsch. Her thick Polish accent prevented her from making the transition to sound films. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Claire Trevor
Claire Trevor
Allegheny Uprising (1939), RKO Radio Pictures, Directed by William A. Seiter. Claire Trevor (1910-2000) made four films with John Wayne, Allegheny Uprising being the second. The others were Stagecoach (1939), Dark Command (1940), and The High and the Mighty (1954). She received a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for her role in Key Largo (1948). On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Joyce Reynolds, Joan Fontaine, Charles Boyer, and Alexis Smith
Joyce Reynolds, Joan Fontaine, Charles Boyer, and Alexis Smith
The Constant Nymph (1943), Warner Bros., Directed by Edmund Goulding. Charles Boyer (1899-1978), Alexis Smith (1921-1993), and Joan Fontaine (1917-2013) form the love triangle in this romantic story. Joyce Reynolds (1925-present) played supporting roles in the 1940s. The Constant Nymph is considered one of her best films. Boyer was nominated for Best Actor four times and received an Honorary Academy Award in 1942. Fontaine was nominated for Best Actress for her role in The Constant Nymph. She won a Best Actress Oscar for Hitchcock’s Suspicion (1941). On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
Double Indemnity (1944), Paramount Pictures, Directed by Billy Wilder. Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990) is the femme fatale in this classic film noir thriller. She was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for this performance. She received an Honorary Academy Award in 1981 and won two Golden Globe Awards and three Emmys in her legendary career in film and television. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Miriam Hopkins
Miriam Hopkins
Design for Living (1933), Paramount Pictures, Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. Miriam Hopkins (1902-1972) signed with Paramount in 1930 and quickly rose to prominent roles. Within five years she received a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her title role in Becky Sharp (1935). Design for Living is one of three highly regarded films she made for director Ernst Lubitsch. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Corrine Griffith
Corrine Griffith
Corinne Griffith (1894-1979) was a popular star of the silent era. As she was not well suited for sound films, she retired. She was a good business woman who had run her own film production company. She became wealthy by investing in real estate. She also wrote a dozen books including two best sellers. One, Papa’s Delicate Condition, was turned into a 1963 movie starring Jackie Gleason. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Esther Williams
Esther Williams
Bathing Beauty (1944), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Directed by George Sidney. Esther Williams (1921-2013) got to Hollywood through her athletic skill. By the time she was 16 she had won three national championships in swimming. When the 1940 Olympics were cancelled due to the war, she joined Billy Rose’s Aquacade and was soon noticed by MGM staff looking for new talent. Williams signed with MGM in 1941. After taking a few small roles, she began to make “aquamusicals” that combined acting, music, synchronized swimming, and diving. These proved very popular, and she made several in the 1940s and 1950s. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin’s Tramp costume consisted of a tightly buttoned jacket that was too small, loose trousers that were much too big, a derby hat that was too small, and shoes that were too big. Chaplin used this costume for over twenty years. It is regarded as perhaps the most recognizable image in the history of movies. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Jean Phillips
Jean Phillips
Among the Living (1941), Paramount Pictures, Directed by Stuart Heisler. Jean Phillips (1914-1970) was an attractive minor actress who made films in the early 1940s. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Spencer Tracy  and Irene Dunne
Spencer Tracy and Irene Dunne
A Guy Named Joe (1943), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Directed by Tim Whelan. John Ford got Spencer Tracy (1900-1967) into the movies, but Tracy’s career didn’t take off until he signed with MGM in 1935. Tracy was nominated for the Best Actor Academy Award nine times and won twice for Captains Courageous (1937) and Boys Town (1938). Irene Dunne (1898-1990) signed with RKO in 1930, and a year later made Cimarron (1931) for which she received a Best Actress Academy Award nomination. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Sonja Henie
Sonja Henie
Sonja Henie (1912-1969) was internationally known due to her skating prowess. She won gold medals in women’s singles at the 1928, 1932, and 1936 Olympics and was a ten-time World Champion from 1927 to 1936. Her contract with Twentieth Century Fox made her one of the highest-paid actresses in Hollywood. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Vera Zorina
Vera Zorina
Vera Zorina (1917-2003) was born in Berlin to Norwegian parents. She was a stage actress and a dancer. After three years with Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo, she returned to the London stage where film producer Samuel Goldwyn discovered her and signed her to a contract. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
W.C. Fields
W.C. Fields
After a difficult childhood, W. C. Fields (1880-1946) became an entertainer. He was regarded as one of the world’s best jugglers, and he performed in the Ziegfeld Follies for several years. He played in Poppy on Broadway for a year. D.W. Griffith saw the show and adapted it to film as Sally of the Sawdust (1925) starring Fields, who starred in a remake in 1936. His comedies such as The Bank Dick (1940) and My Little Chickadee (1940) are classics. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Vivien Leigh and Robert Taylor
Vivien Leigh and Robert Taylor
Waterloo Bridge (1940), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Vivien Leigh (1913-1967) was 26 when she played Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind (1939), the role for which she will always be remembered and one for which she received the first of her two Best Actress Academy Awards. The other Oscar was for A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Leigh made only 19 movies in her career, but she is remembered as a Hollywood legend. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Thank You – Please Donate to Support More Great Exhibitions Like This One
Thank You – Please Donate to Support More Great Exhibitions Like This One

 

Details

Start:
March 27 @ 5:00 pm
End:
August 15 @ 4:00 pm
Event Categories:
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Venue

Museum of Art – DeLand
600 N. Woodland Blvd.
DeLand, FL 32720 United States
Phone:
386-734-4371