Loading Events

« All Events

Hollywood Stills

March 27 @ 5:00 pm - June 7 @ 4:00 pm

Photographs from The Butler Institute of American Art

Please Note: This exhibition is now on-view in person at our 600 N. Woodland Blvd. galleries. However, we’ll continue to offer weekly virtual viewing selections below for those who would like to maintain social distance. You can read about the on-site safety precautions we are taking at each of our locations here.

ABOUT THIS EXHIBITION

From the very inception of the motion picture industry, still images have accompanied the release and marketing of feature films, drawing-in customers to the local “movie houses” with their evocative images and studies of the stars. From the late silent film era to more modern times, artful and dramatically composed photographs were used to capture the essence of the features they highlighted. Displayed in glass cases outside the theaters, these pictures were sometimes used in local print advertising, as well as accompanying spicy stories in magazines like Photoplay and Modern Screen.

Many of the artists were the movies’ own camera operators and crew members, excellent still photographers who augmented their roles as on-set documentarians. Not only were specific moments from the actual films captured, but also “behind the scenes” images of the cast, crew, and set.

This fascinating exhibition contains 200 of the best examples of these cinematic advertising images. Although these photographs were specifically created for promotional purposes, they display a fine art sensibility, demonstrating expert technical knowledge and often a keen sense of drama and composition. Many of the photographs in this collection were produced anonymously, but others represent the work of more eminent Hollywood photographers such as Edward Steichen, George Hurrell, and Robert Coburn.

Some of Hollywood’s most memorable movies are encapsulated in the dramatic impressions these photographs convey. The stunning exhibition is made possible by the Butler Institute of American Art, through a generous gift from the private collection of Mr. and Mrs. George Kelley.

Exhibition Details:

Hollywood Stills: Photographs from the Butler Institute of American Art

On view March 27 – June 7, 2020

600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand, Florida 32720

 

Top Image: Hollywood Cavalcade, Photograph, Alice Faye, Stuart Erwin, and Don Ameche

Hollywood Stills – Virtual Gallery
Hollywood Stills – Virtual Gallery
Jean Harlow
Jean Harlow
Platinum Blonde (1931), Columbia Pictures, Directed by Frank Capra Jean Harlow (1911-1937) had made two dozen films by the time Frank Capra directed her in Platinum Blonde, which made her the new national sex symbol. She subsequently signed with MGM and made half a dozen films with Clark Gable. She died of uremic poisoning when she was only 26. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Humphrey Bogart, Julie Bishop, and Raymond Massey
Humphrey Bogart, Julie Bishop, and Raymond Massey
Action in the North Atlantic (1943), Warner Bros., Directed by Lloyd Bacon. Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), Julie Bishop (1914-2001), and Raymond Massey (1896-1983) star in this wartime action thriller. Bogart had just done Casablanca (1942), for which he received a Best Actor nomination. Massey had received a similar nomination for Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940). Julie Bishop had been making movies since 1923. Due to the government’s wartime restrictions, this whole movie had to be shot on the Warner backlot. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Charles Coburn and Barbara Stanwyck
Charles Coburn and Barbara Stanwyck
The Lady Eve (1941), Paramount Pictures, Directed by Preston Sturges. Charles Coburn (1877-1961) and Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990) play father and daughter card sharps trying to teach Henry Fonda’s character a lesson in this screwball comedy. Coburn made his Broadway debut in 1901 but did not make his first film until he was in his late fifties. Stanwyck, one of Hollywood’s most versatile and most popular stars, is brilliant in this comedy. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Irene Dunne
Irene Dunne
Showboat (1936), Universal Pictures, Directed by James Whale. It is not surprising that Irene Dunne (1898-1990) starred in Showboat. She was playing Showboat on stage with a national tour when she was discovered. She signed with RKO in 1930 and was soon on her way to stardom. Her second film was Cimarron (1931), for which she received a Best Actress Academy Award nomination. She was also nominated for Best Actress in Theodora Goes Wild (1936), The Awful Truth (1937), Love Affair (1939), and I Remember Mama (1948). On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Betty Grable
Betty Grable
Betty Grable (1916-1973) was one of the great beauties of Hollywood and a favorite pin-up of World War II soldiers. She was playing minor film roles by the age of 13, and she signed an RKO contract when she was 15. She made many popular musicals, and by 1947 she was the highest paid star in America. Her last film was released in 1955. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
John Howard and Ellen Drew
John Howard and Ellen Drew
The Mad Doctor (1940), Paramount Pictures, Directed by Tim Whelan. John Howard (1913-1995) is remembered for playing the title character in a series of Bulldog Drummond films in the 1930s and for his performances in Lost Horizon (1937) and The Philadelphia Story (1940). Ellen Drew (1915-2003) signed with Paramount and played several starlet roles before drawing better assignments. She made films from 1936 to the 1950s but never quite achieved stardom. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Ella Raines
Ella Raines
Ella Raines (1920-1988) was an attractive leading lady from the early 1940s to the mid-1950s. In 1944 she made Hail the Conquering Hero with Eddie Bracken, Tall in the Saddle with John Wayne, and her most memorable role in Phantom Lady with Franchot Tone. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
John Wayne and Paulette Goddard
John Wayne and Paulette Goddard
Reap the Wild Wind (1942), Paramount Pictures, Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. Both John Wayne (1907-1979) and Paulette Goddard (1910-1990) had breakthrough films in 1939 that made them box office favorites. Wayne went on to become one of the greatest stars in Hollywood history. Goddard was regarded as one of the most beautiful film actresses. Reap the Wild Wind won the Oscar for Special Effects and was nominated for Best Cinematography and Best Art Direction. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Barbara Hale
Barbara Hale
Higher and Higher (1943), RKO Radio Pictures, Directed by Tim Whelan. Barbara Hale (1922-2017) made films from 1943 to the mid-1950s when she began to focus much more on television. She is remembered for her TV role as Perry Mason’s legal secretary Della Street. Hale was in 263 of the 271 episodes of Perry Mason that ran from 1957 to 1966. Then she was in 30 Perry Mason TV movies made between 1985 and 1995. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Lily Damita and Lester Vail
Lily Damita and Lester Vail
The Woman Between (1931), RKO Radio Pictures, Directed by Victor Schertzinger. Lily Damita (1904-1994) was a French-American actress who made her first American film in 1929. She made several more in the 1930s. She is remembered more for her husbands than her films. Her first husband was Oscar-winning director Michael Curtiz; her second was actor Errol Flynn. Lester Vail (1899-1959) was and actor and director. He made eight films in the 1930s. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
The Faith Healer (1921)
The Faith Healer (1921)
Famous Players-Lasky, Directed by George Melford. This production still shows a typical setup. The actors are being given instruction, and George Melford’s Director’s Chair is visible in the left foreground. One can also see the fake walls, the large lights, and the awning above the set to shield the scene from natural light coming through the skylight. Silent films obviously had no sound, so several films could be shot side by side simultaneously. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland
Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland
Rooney (1920-2014) and Garland (1922-2011) were juvenile stars who grew into adult stars. They made eight films together. Rooney earned four Oscar nominations and received a Juvenile Award and an Honorary Oscar from the Academy. He also won two Golden Globe awards and an Emmy. Garland also received a Juvenile Award from the Academy and won two Golden Globes and a Grammy Award. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Phantom of the Opera (1943)
Phantom of the Opera (1943)
Universal Pictures, Directed by Arthur Lubin. Phantom of the Opera has been filmed many times, but the two most famous are the 1925 silent version with Lon Chaney and the 1943 sound version with Nelson Eddy and Claude Rains. The opera house set seen in this still was built for the 1925 version on Universal’s back lot. The same set was used again when Universal made the sound version eighteen years later. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Marion Davies
Marion Davies
Marion Davies (1897-1961) is remembered today as the actress who was William Randolph Hearst’s mistress. Though factually true, this does Davies a disservice as she was an actress with real talent. Some historians feel she was hurt more than helped by Hearst’s money. She made a smooth transition to sound films and retired from film in the late 1930s. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Rita Hayworth
Rita Hayworth
The Strawberry Blonde (1941), Warner Bros., Directed by Raoul Walsh. Rita Hayworth (1918-1987) signed her first movie contract with Fox when she was 16. Born Margarita Cansino, she became Rita Hayworth when Columbia boss Harry Cohn signed her and changed her name. Columbia loaned her to Warner Bros. to make The Strawberry Blonde. On loan from the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Thank You – Please Donate to Support More Great Exhibitions Like This One
Thank You – Please Donate to Support More Great Exhibitions Like This One

 

Details

Start:
March 27 @ 5:00 pm
End:
June 7 @ 4:00 pm
Event Categories:
,

Venue

Museum of Art – DeLand
600 N. Woodland Blvd.
DeLand, FL 32720 United States
Phone:
386-734-4371